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Technology Dialectics 08-800
Constructing Appropriate Technology 08-300

Professor: Latanya Sweeney, Ph.D., latanya@dataprivacylab.org
TA: Yiheng Li, yihengta@dataprivacylab.org
TA: Xiaoqian Jiang, xiaoqianta@dataprivacylab.org
Grader: Wanhong Xu, wanhongta@dataprivacylab.org
Lecture: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:30-3:00pm, Wean 4615A
Office: Contact Sherice Livingston at shericeta@dataprivacylab.org to make an appointment with Prof. Sweeney. Contact Yiheng Li, Xiaoqian Jiang, Wanhong Xu directly.
Links: Schedule, Syllabus



Course Descriptions

Constructing Appropriate Technology 08-300 (Undergraduate)

How can you make sure the technology you create will avoid pitfalls from unforeseen privacy, usability, or market problems? This course teaches students how to conduct research and develop technology across disciplines, so that the resulting technology is provably appropriate for a given personal, societal, organizational, and/or legal context. Students learn to fuse scientific research methods (naturalistic observation, survey, interviews, and experimentation), which describe existing phenomena, with computer science methods and engineering approaches. Topics include formulating problem statements, modeling real-world constraints, including end-user participation, determining validity, assessing generalizability, generating guarantees, and a unifying paradigm ("Technology Dialectics") for providing provably appropriate solutions. Students also gain hands-on experience working jointly on the construction of real-world technology.


Technology Dialectics 08-800 (Graduate)

How can you harness cross-disciplinary knowledge to improve your technology and protect it from unforeseen privacy, usability, or market problems? This course teaches students how to conduct research and develop technology across disciplines, so that the resulting technology is provably appropriate for a given personal, societal, organizational, and/or legal context. Students learn to fuse scientific research methods (naturalistic observation, survey, interviews, and experimentation), which describe existing phenomena, with computer science methods and engineering approaches. Topics include formulating problem statements, modeling real-world constraints, including end-user participation, determining validity, assessing generalizability, generating guarantees, and a unifying paradigm ("Technology Dialectics") for providing provably appropriate solutions. This course is ideal for new graduate students who intend to conduct and publish graduate research across disciplines. It offers a good primer for multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research and development.

Contact Information

Course web site: http://dataprivacylab.org/courses/dialectics/index.html
Email discussion: dialectics@dataprivacylab.org


Course Links


Handouts and books

There is no required textbook for this course. Instead, we will provide course copies and working papers as the course progresses. Handouts will principally be available at the course web site.


Related links at Carnegie Mellon:


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